Democratic Presidential Primary Tracker: The Quest for 1991 – Super Tuesday

Dentons’ Public Policy group has created a series of quick-reference guides to keep you informed throughout the “Quest for 1991,” the magic number needed to secure the Democratic nomination for President. The guide provides a high-level overview on current polling, delegate count and process – all on just one page.

Democratic Presidential Primary Tracker: The Quest for 1991 – South Carolina

Dentons’ Public Policy group has created a series of quick-reference guides to keep you informed throughout the “Quest for 1991,” the magic number needed to secure the Democratic nomination for President. The guide provides a high-level overview on current polling, delegate count and process – all on just one page.

Democratic Presidential Primary Tracker: The Quest for 1991 – Nevada

Dentons’ Public Policy group has created a series of quick-reference guides to keep you informed throughout the “Quest for 1991,” the magic number needed to secure the Democratic nomination for President. The guide provides a high-level overview on current polling, looks at television ad spend – all on just one page.

Democratic Presidential Primary Tracker: The Quest for 1991 – New Hampshire

Dentons’ Public Policy group has created a series of quick-reference guides to keep you informed throughout the “Quest for 1991,” the magic number needed to secure the Democratic nomination for President. The guide provides a high-level overview on current polling, looks at television ad spend – all on just one page.

Democratic Presidential Primary Tracker: The Quest for 1991 – Iowa

After a summer and fall of county fairs, coffee shop photo ops, televised debates and selfie lines, it’s happening.

Voters are voting. And they do it first in the Iowa Caucuses.

Dentons’ Public Policy Team has prepared the first in its Quest for 1991 series (1991 is the magic number needed to secure the Democratic nomination for President) in an attempt to keep you informed as the process slogs along. Our Iowa update seeks to explain the unique caucus process, checks in with current polling, and looks at the television ad spend. All on just one page.

US Policy Scan 2020

Policy Scan 2020 booklet

The Dentons US Public Policy Team is pleased to release its annual Policy Scan, our comprehensive overview of the policy and political landscape in 2020. We look to highlight movements across the spectrum of policy areas in the coming year. With our team’s unmatched reach, we not only look at issues in our nation’s capital but in every state capital in the union as well. We review the US Supreme Court docket and briefly profile the major cases of the term, both those still to be argued and those already argued with decisions pending. We look at trends across the globe and their impact on US policy. Finally, we delve into Election 2020 at the presidential, congressional, gubernatorial and state AG levels.

US Policy Scan 2020 takes deep dives into the turbulent political and policy waters swirling around health care, including drug pricing; energy and climate change; financial services regulation; tax cuts; foreign relations; trade; immigration; telecommunications, transportation and infrastructure; defense and homeland security; privacy; and other hotly-debated areas of government regulation and policy.

Other features include:

  • Year In Review
  • 2020 Congressional Calendars
  • Policy Review
  • A view from the water’s edge
  • Campaign 2020

And as in years past, we also include a review of state legislative activity in 2019, and an overview of pending legislation and the policy drivers that will shape state legislative and executive branch activity in 2020.

We hope that Policy Scan gives you the foundation to tackle obstacles and succeed in what is sure to be a chaotic and unprecedented year ahead.

Facebook releases updated disclosure rules for political ads in advance of 2020 elections

In a preemptive effort designed to enhance transparency for the upcoming 2020 elections, Facebook has announced that it will strengthen its digital advertisement program rules for political ads to increase disclosure requirements for advertisers using the platform. The decision comes after months of scrutiny from Congress and growing public concern over the use of Facebook’s platform by foreign actors to spread political misinformation during the course of the 2016 election cycle. 

The 2016 presidential election saw a record amount of digital political advertising across the country, with the majority of spending going toward major technology players such as Facebook and Google. With multiple congressional investigations and the report of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller verifying that foreign actors took advantage of these platforms to spread misinformation via targeted political advertisements leading up to the 2016 election, technology companies are under mounting pressure to take action to combat the spread of misinformation.

With this goal in mind, Facebook’s new digital advertisement review program guidelines will implement more stringent transparency rules for advertisers seeking to purchase ad space on the social media platform. The newly adopted procedures will require advertisers to supply significantly more information about their organization during the purchasing process than what the company has previously required. Moving forward, when securing ad space, advertisers will be required to provide information such as a U.S. street address, phone number, business email and business website matching the listed email – all information that indicates the existence of a legitimate domestic enterprise.

Additionally, Facebook is implementing new disclaimer requirements in order to improve transparency surrounding ‘Paid for by’ disclaimers. Under the company’s new policy, advertisers will be required to provide organizational information that will be used to create an information field – or “i” icon that appears on a posting – and allow site users to confirm that the organizations are legitimate actors. As part of this change, Facebook has also announced new guidelines for advertisers who wish to be certified as a ‘Confirmed Organization’ on the social network. In order to be recognized as the most trusted ‘Confirmed Organization’, advertisers must provide a tax ID number, Federal Election Commission (FEC) ID number, or a government website domain that matches an email ending with a government (.gov) or military (.mil) email line.

While Facebook has taken this first step toward revamping its internal political advertising policies and disclosure requirements, it is difficult to predict the full impact this change will have during the 2020 federal election cycle. Just as digital political advertising and marketing have outpaced the regulatory efforts of federal and state lawmakers across the country, so has it (to a lesser degree) outpaced the transparency and disclosure actions of the private platforms themselves.  Once can likely expect the same in the current cycle, but Facebook’s new policy still represents an important first move by Silicon Valley to dissuade foreign and other bad actors from poisoning the well of political discourse heading into 2020. 

As election season heats up next year, Dentons expects to see more changes to social media and technology companies’ digital advertisement policies and will endeavor to keep our readership posted.