With Connecticut’s legislative session in rear view, elections on horizon

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The following legislative recap and elections forecast comes by way of Dentons 50 partner firm the Connecticut Group–editor

The 2018 legislative session came to a close on Wednesday night. Although it was a so-called “short session,” that didn’t mean it wasn’t packed with activity on a number of major policy proposals. Many big-ticket bills passed, including:

  • A compromise budget between Republicans and Democrats, which closed a $200+ million deficit in the ’18-’19 fiscal year.
  • Major energy legislation that increases the state’s “renewable portfolio standard,” requiring the state’s utilities and energy suppliers to purchase an increasing amount of energy generated by renewable resources.
  • A bill instituting a statewide ban on “bump stocks.”
  • Legislation providing “dreamers” with access to financial aid at state colleges and universities.

Many high profile proposals, such as a minimum wage increase, the anti-sexual harassment “time’s up” bill, two frameworks for state-based net neutrality regulations, and a bill authorizing tolling on state highways all died at sine die.

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Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton secured the endorsement of the Connecticut GOP on Saturday evening at the Republican State Convention. It’s Boughton’s third time running for Governor, and his first time running with the party’s endorsement.

Former Trumbull First Selectman Tim Herbst and businessman Steve Obsitnik both received enough delegate support to qualify for a primary against Boughton, which they plan to take on. Businessmen David Stemerman and Bob Stefanowski, as well as Shelton Mayor Mark Lauretti plan to petition their way onto the primary ballot.

Sen. Joe Markley won the GOP endorsement for Lt. Governor over New Britain Mayor Erin Stewart and Darien First Selectwoman Jayme Stevenson. Both Stevenson and Stewart plan to challenge Markley in a primary race for the party’s nomination.