Where McConnell’s latest attempt to pass a health care bill stands

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s latest attempt to pass the GOP’s health care agenda was revived this week with the release of an updated bill.

However, two Republican senators, Susan Collins of Maine and Rand Paul of Kentucky, quickly have said they would not support a procedural vote early next week that would bring the latest health care proposal to the floor. With no more votes to spare, leadership enters the weekend focused on their whip operation.

Here’s a summary of the latest round of horse trading as illustrated in the newest version of the bill:

  • CassidyMedicaid base year: latest draft allows late expansion states to only use four quarters of data for their per capita base year and not eight. Important for Louisiana.
  • MurkowskiEnhanced FMAP: latest draft includes an enhanced 100% FMAP for eligible individuals who are members of an ‘Indian tribe’, which will be helpful in multiple states, but is written to also include individuals in Alaska.
  • RubioPublic health expenditures: latest draft exempts public health expenditures from both the Medicaid per capita caps and block grant funding. A priority for Sen. Rubio considering Florida’s experience with the Zika outbreak.
  • Portman/ CapitoOpioid Funding: latest draft includes an additional $45 billion for the opioid crisis, specifically for state grants for treatment and recovery programs as well as research money into pain and addiction with respect to the crisis.
  • Corker/ Thune and several GOP SenatorsIncrease affordability: latest draft includes additional $70 billion to the Long Term Stability fund to help individuals purchase health coverage at a lower price.
  • Moderate GOPKeep some ACA taxes: Latest draft maintains two ACA taxes against high income Americans (Medicare tax on high earners and net investment tax).
  • ConservativesMarket reform: latest draft allows HSA funds to pay for insurance premiums, allow catastrophic plans to be sold on exchanges and allows subsidies to be used to buy them; Medicaid: latest draft maintains Toomey’s slower per capita cap growth rate than in house-passed bill; Cruz proposal: latest draft includes bracketed language that would allow insurers that sell ACA compliant plans (at least one gold and silver) to also offer plans off the exchange that would be exempt from several ACA insurance requirements (including pre-existing conditions, community rating and guaranteed issue) but would allow federal subsidies to be used to purchase them.

Is it enough?

  • Sens. Rand Paul and Susan Collins reiterated their opposition almost immediately after the new draft was released; therefore GOP leadership cannot afford another no vote.
  • First vote will be a procedural vote– on the motion to proceed– that is a procedural vote to start debating the House-passed bill. GOP leadership has been working with Senators emphasizing the need for a Republican-led Senate to be able to vote to get on an Obamacare repeal bill so they can start debating the contents of the legislation.

What will the Parliamentarian say?

  • This week started the official litigation with the Senate Parliamentarian where majority and minority staff are both present to argue their case as to whether provisions of the draft legislation violate the Byrd rule. The process was focused on provisions in the first CBO score and this week focused on Medicaid provisions, tax provisions and the insurance provisions in Title II of the draft.
  • What the parliamentarian said this week about the insurance provisions, the Sec. 1332 waiver changes, etc will have an impact of the politics of the bill. Will the parliamentarian strike any of the provisions that the conservatives point to as repealing parts of the Obamacare.
  • These official litigations will continue next week to include the new provisions in the latest draft, including the Cruz proposal, next week.

What will the CBO say?

  • A new CBO score is due out early next week, as early as Monday. Originally, reports suggested CBO would have two scores, one with the Cruz proposal and one without. However, since the CBO didn’t receive legislative language until too late on the Cruz proposal, it is likely the CBO will not have the time to score that part of the newly released draft.
  • Leaving GOP Leadership of having to find another official body to do the analysis of the Cruz proposal, possibly OMB or CMS.